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CES News

 

CES to co-sponsor conference on “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization,” Claremont, California, June 4-7, 2015.

The Center for Ecozoic Societies is now an official Co-Sponsor of the conference “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization,” Claremont, California, June 4-7, 2015.

 

Herman Greene to co-lead Law Track of conference on “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization.”

This conference features 82 tracks in twelve sections as described in the article on the conference below. The law track falls within the “Social Thought” section. The current description of this track is as follows:

Law Track Title: Law, Legal Theory, and Legal Practice

The Law Track will assess and evaluate the participation of law in the ecological crisis and explore how relational philosophies and worldviews, including but not limited to Whitehead’s process-relational thought, can be useful in critiquing the current state of legal theory and practice and in offering constructive proposals for reform.

Law Track Panels Organized to Date (February 19, 2015):

  1. Talking about Law in a Process-Relational Context: Introducing who we are, why we are here and sharing first thoughts on what we might accomplish – An Introduction and Opening Conversation with Law Track Attendees. (Session organized and facilitated by Herman Greene, Mark Modak-Truran & Howard J. Vogel, Law Track Organizers.)
  1. Process Thought and Legal Theory Currently, the panelists include: (1) Mark Modak- Truran, J. Will Young Professor of Law, Mississippi College School of Law, (2) Kevin P. Lee, Associate Professor of Law, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, (3) James MacLean, Associate Professor in International Criminal Law, Director, Centre for Law, Ethics and Globalisation, University of Southampton Law School, and (4) Robert P. Burns, Professor of Law, Northwestern University School of Law. (Session organized by Mark Modak-Truran)
  1. Franklin I. Gamwell’s Process Political Theory and Constitutional Law (Tentative Title). This panel will focus on the implications of Franklin I. Gamwell’s work in process political theory for re-imagining constitutional law by using Gamwell’s work as a resource for that task. Currently, the panelists include: (1) Franklin I. Gamwell, Shailer Mathews Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Religious Ethics, the Philosophy of Religions, and Theology, The Divinity School of the University of Chicago, (2) Howard J. Vogel, Professor Emeritus, Hamline University School of Law, (3) Mark Modak- Truran, J. Will Young Professor of Law, Mississippi College School of Law, and (4) Robert P. Burns, Professor of Law, Northwestern University School of Law. (Session organized by Mark Modak-Truran)
  1. How Protection of the Environment Requires Rethinking the Idea of Property This panel will focus on the complex “idea of property” (as in legal theory and practice has been described in Laura Underkuffler’s work) sets the stage for reframing property law in light of the looming ecological crisis and the failure of environmental law to secure a sustainable approach to working with Earth’s resources. Currently, the panelists include: (1) Laura Underkuffler, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and J. DuPratt White Professor of Law, Cornell University Law School, and (2) Gerald Torres, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law, Cornell University Law School. (Session organized by Howard J. Vogel)
  1. Legal Pluralism in a Globalized World: Re-imagining Dispute Systems as Relational Worldmaking Practices A conversation with (1) Jayne Seminare Docherty, Professor and Program Director, Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, Eastern Mennonite University, and (2) Kenneth H. Fox, Professor and Director for Conflict Studies, Hamline University, Senior Fellow, Dispute Resolution Institute, Hamline University School of Law. (Session organized by Howard J. Vogel)
  1. The Rights of Nature. Many have advocated for the rights of nature. This proves to be a very difficult concept to put into legal practice. Every human action has costs to nature. Who “speaks” for nature”? What rights do the myriad details, species, individuals, and systems of nature have? What are the relative rights among them and between them and humans? Is “rights” a useful language for this subject? This is a panel to evaluate how to give nature rights whether this term is used or not. (Session organized by Herman Greene)
  1. Earth Jurisprudence—Sources and Administration of: Globalization, Global Governance, Nations, Corporations, Ecology (to be organized by Herman Greene). As numerous reports have made clear, the distinctive challenge of our time is that the ecological crisis is planetary. This calls for a planetary response at a time when some say “corporations rule the world,” nation-states are ineffectual in addressing such problems, the United Nations lacks coercive power, global treaties have not changed the path of the deterioration of planetary ecosystems. What role does the “rule of law” have to play in addressing the global ecological crisis? What would the sources of such global laws be and how would they be administered? What is the role of multi-national corporations in global ecological governance? What would it mean to have a system of governance by which humanity would operate within planetary boundaries and provide sufficiency for all (the “Safe Operating Space for Humanity”?) This is a panel for creative thinking. (Session organized by Herman Greene)

 “Seizing an Alternative” in Legal Theory and Legal Practice: Next steps? A Closing Conversation, exploring with Law Track Attendees, where we might go from here in light of the experience we have shared during our time together at the conference. (Session organized and facilitated by Herman Greene, Mark Modak-Truran & Howard J. Vogel, Law Track Organizers.)

 

Herman Greene to provide assistance in United Religions Initiative Environmental Leaders Training, March 11-15, 2015, San Francisco.

The United Religions Initiative (URI) came into being on June 26, 2000 to “promote enduring, daily interfaith cooperation, to end religiously motivated violence and to create cultures of peace, justice and healing for the Earth and all living beings.” Bill Swing, who served as the Episcopal Bishop of California for 26 years was the founder of URI. Cooperation Circles, each involving at least three spiritual or religious traditions and each having some project of service are the heart of URI. The Cooperation Circles are self-organizing, self-governing and self-funding. They address, among other things, religiously motivated violence, environmental degradation and poverty.

There are currently Cooperation Circles in 85 countries involving more than 500,000 people. They range in size from the minimum of seven people to tens of thousands. New Cooperation Circles are being created monthly.

The focus are for this year’s Circles of Light event to be held in San Francisco on March 14 is “Global Greening from the Grassroots.” In connection with this event 15 leaders of environmental cooperation circles from around the world—over 167 of URI’s Cooperation Circles focus on the environment—will be brought to San Francisco for a training event led by URI Staff and the Environmental Resource Cooperation Circle (ERCC) of which Herman Greene is a part. The ERCC serves all of the environmentally oriented Cooperation Circles and the training session will be oriented at developing a URI environmental network.